Posted in Sustainable Homes and Living

Migrating Culture

MIGRATING CULTURE is an African/American design campaign creatively established in 2006 with key projects in Ghana, West Africa. The original concept  was to organize a consortium of artisans that would enable a cultural exchange both locally (Ghana) and worldwide.

Its founder, Brandon Rogers, is based in Ghana and has a strong background in architectural design and interest in the construction industry. Brandon has collaborated with local architecture firms, non-profit organizations, and numerous local builders and professionals throughout a number of rural villages. With the knowledge and perspective gained from both his research and in-field experiences, Brandon began to promote sustainable/ green building techniques as alternative solutions to the traditional methods.

Brandon has focused on earthbag building as a technique which the average rural family could utilize to build stronger, more efficient homes. To date Brandon and the diverse team of tradesmen and youth apprentices have constructed three projects, which display the possibilities of the earth bag wall system and other green methods.

If you visit their website you can see many examples of the fine building projects they have completed. I applaud their efforts and the results.

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Posted in Sustainable Homes and Living

Homesteading Family Living Off-Grid in a Spectacular Earthship

This inspiring off-grid homesteading family lives in a renovated stone earthship. They grow their own food, collect rainwater, use solar power, have composting toilets, and they have a pond that filters their grey water. On top of living an eco friendly lifestyle, they dedicate their work to important projects like urban gardening and promoting industrial hemp as “Hempbassadors.”

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Posted in Sustainable Homes and Living

Natural Building and a New Sense of the Earth


This nearly one hour video program features some of the luminaries of the natural building movement and is well worth watching. In addition to the many interviews are some luscious images of the process and result of fine natural craftsmanship.

Meet Linda Smiley and Ianto Evans who pioneered cob building in the U.S. and who now run the North American School of Natural Building in Coquille, Oregon where they and their students have used natural building methods to create a little village. Coenraad and Courtney Rogmans took a piece of undeveloped land, built straw bale and cob buildings complete with solar electricity and a water catchment system, and now teach natural building workshops. Taylor Starr at White Oak Farm, an organic farm and educational center, is putting the final touches on a striking timber-framed straw bale and cob community center. Brendan Flanagan, with his family and friends, turned a remote wooded hillside into a snug community of homes and gardens. Rob Bolman, an advocate of incorporating natural building techniques into mainstream building practices, created an ecovillage in the middle of Eugene, Oregon, and speaks passionately about the link between natural building and social justice. Meka Bunch, after only a week-long workshop, built his own elegant cob cottage and now works sharing natural building with people abroad. And Kiko Denzer, a sculptor and cob builder, and his wife Hannah, an organic gardener and baker, transformed a dilapidated outbuilding in the country into a cozy cob home surrounded by beautiful gardens.

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Posted in Sustainable Homes and Living

An Environmentally Sound Alternative to Portland Cement

Cement has been called the foundation of modern civilization, the stuff of highways, bridges, sidewalks and buildings of all sizes. But its production comes with a huge carbon footprint. Environmental chemist David Stone was seeking a way to keep iron from rusting when he stumbled upon a possible substitute that requires significantly less energy. Special correspondent Kathleen McCleery reports.

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