Kaniwa (Qañiwa) – test crop

Here is a test crop, from seeds that we had bought at our local bulk-food store. The seeds are very tiny to use for cooking, so I thought why not give it a try as a microgreen. Will let you know how they taste.

Kaniwa is a “cousin” of Quinoa, which has become very popular over the last few years and is considered a “superfood” for it’s protein. Like Quinoa, Kaniwa also hails from a South America. Cultivated in Peru and Bolivia, Kaniwa is the seed from a flowering plant called Goosefoot (Chenopodium pallidicaule).

Nutrients (seeds)

Kaniwa seeds are complete proteins, meaning that they contain all of the essential amino acids your body cannot produce itself (Roussell, 2012). Kaniwa is particularly high in lysine, an amino acid that is typically found only in small amounts in grain products. Kaniwa seeds contain a variety of vitamins and minerals that support your body’s physiological processes. These nutrients include iron, B vitamins, vitamin E, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, and manganese.

Description

Kaniwa is a “cousin” of Quinoa, which has become very popular over the last few years and is considered a Superfood for it’s protein. Like Quinoa, Kaniwa also hails from a South America. Cultivated in Peru and Bolivia, Kaniwa is the seed from a flowering plant called White Goosefoot.

Nutrients (seeds)

Kaniwa seeds are complete proteins, meaning that they contain all of the essential amino acids your body cannot produce itself. Kaniwa is particularly high in lysine, an amino acid that is typically found only in small amounts in grain products. Kaniwa seeds contain a variety of vitamins and minerals that support your body’s physiological processes. These nutrients include iron, B vitamins, vitamin E, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, and manganese.