Posted in Gardening & Backyard Farming

hugelkultur – the ultimate raised garden beds

richsoil.com permies.com Hugelkultur is raised garden beds that reduce or eliminate the need for irrigation and fertilizer. This video shows the why and how of this type of raised garden bed. Hugelkultur can be built by hand or with machinery; urban lots or large acreage farms; The focal point of this video is a project in Dayton, Montana where Sepp Holzer installed nearly a kilometer of hugelkultur beds in early May of 2012. Then the video shows the results in mid September. Michael Billington is currently the land manager there. He explains how the beds have not been irrigated and goes into some detail of the qualities of the food from the different aspects of the hugelkultur the north side tends to be sweeter and the south side tends to have more bite (lettuces tend to be more bitter and mustards tend to be hotter). Special appearances by Christy Nieto from Bellingham, Washington (see her smaller berm / raised garden bed in the background – she reduced, but did not eliminate irrigation); Melanie and Brad Knight from Sage Mountain Homestead in Corvallis, Montana (building hugelkultur with a bobcat); Sepp Holzer adding branch mulch plus throwing seed; Jessica "Jessi" Peterson showing the mulching technique. The recipie is: wood and brush covered with soil; immediately plant seeds; a bit of mulch helps. Because the sides of the raised garden beds are usually steep, adding mulch is done by pinning the mulch to the sides with branches shaped like pegs (referred to as nails <b>…</b>
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a tour of 4 outhouses

permies.com The fourth is an amazing piece of art. With some really smart engineering. It seems that the secret to having no odor is to have a large pit and to vent the pit. It also helps to separate the pee. In all four, folks were encouraged to pee outside – way from the outhouses. Sawdust is used in case there is any smell. A properly built outhouse can be better for the environment than a septic tank or a sewage treatment plant. I like these three designs much better than any of the humanure systems or composting toilets. Relevant www.permies.com www.permies.com www.permies.com www.permies.com music by Jimmy Pardo
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not so free light bulbs – farmer laboratory

www.richsoil.com This video covers: – how the power company charges more to pay for "free" light bulbs – the goal is fewer power plants – a five dollar clothes line would save more – energy audits are lame – the longevity of light bulbs – tested – situations of using a light for 30 seconds or less – the luminosity for the first 30 seconds – the amount of electricity to construct a light bulb – CFL subsidies in australia and the incandescent ban – total energy cost of a CFL – CFL toxicity during construction, during use and after disposal – the 2008 data sheet from the EPA comparing mercury pollution – IQ Drop – impact on concentration – UV burns – catching on fire – epipleptic siezures – cataracts – cancer Thanks to all the folks that chipped in through kickstarter for this video. Including the "executive producer of odd smells" makeitmissoula.com Thanks to Camille Pearl and Durk Collins for playing parts. Relevant www.permies.com www.permies.com www.richsoil.com www.richsoil.com www.permies.com music by Jimmy Pardo
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Sepp Holzer’s Bone Sauce/Salve How To

www.permies.com Sepp Holzer explains how to make his bone sauce. And why. It was originally for use when castrating animals. A bit of the salve was put on the "wound" and would help with healing while keeping flies away. It turns out this stuff keeps pretty much all animals and insects away. Which leads to the primary use today – to keep deer and voles off of freshly planted fruit trees. The cast iron pots in this video are considered a bit on the small side, but since Sepp ends up saying "perfection" then they must be acceptable. The first pot is buried in moist soil leaving an inch or two above ground. The second, upper, pot if filled with bones and a screen goes between the two pots. Clay seals the pots. A small fire is burned on top of the pots for about two hours. Then the wood is pulled away and the pots are covered with dirt. Let the pots cool overnight. Carefully clean all of the dirt off so that no dirt ends up in the bone sauce salve. Before putting it on trees, you can thin it out with any edible oil. Sepp mentions olive oil. Guest appearances by Dr. Immo Fiebrig (translating), Bill Schnieders, Afia Menke, ND, the brothers Julian and Nick, and Jessi Peterson. Relevant threads at permies: www.permies.com www.richsoil.com music by Jimmy Pardo
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how to render lard

www.permies.com Suzy Bean renders lard in her favorite way. And she talks about some other lard rendering techniques that she has tried and doesn't like as much. The way she likes the stove top "dry method" (no water) in a cast iron skillet. She says a stainless steel pan would be good too. Low to medium heat. Some ways she doesn't like as much: crock pot: the cracklins don't crackle. they're mushy. And there might be water in the lard oven: it's fine, but it takes a while the wet method in a cast iron skillet: fine, but why bother when the dry method works so well In this video, she uses "leaf lard" which is actually not yet lard. It is organ fat which will be rendered into lard. Leaf lard makes the very best lard – which makes the very best cookies, pie crusts and pastries! This is as opposed to "back fat" which makes a lard suitable for savory cooking. Cut the fat up and toss it in the skillet. When the pork rinds look yummy, you're ready. take the cracklings out and pour the liquid lard into a mason jar through a cheesecloth. Done. Why do this? Because the fat does not store well. It will go nasty in a few days. The lard will keep for months or even years. Suzy confesses that she had some fat go moldy once. I do some movie magic time lapse fast forward stuff in a coupla spots. I show the fat rendering quickly and I show the liquid turning to a solid quickly. Relevant threads at permies: www.permies.com www.permies.com www.permies.com www.permies.com www.richsoil.com <b>…</b>
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montana buffalo

www.permies.com Just some buffalo filmed a little south of Missoula, Montana. Plus some new music from my friend Jimmy Pardo "Buncha Weirdos" For the part where the buffalo glot close to me, i was humming the tune. That seemed to draw them in. Relevant threads at permies (with more info about the music): www.permies.com www.permies.com www.permies.com
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why permaculture folks love comfrey

www.permies.com Comfrey may be the most talked about permaculture plant. It is commonly planted under fruit trees because it does not compete with tree roots, but it does compete with plants that do compete with tree roots. Alexia Allen of Hawthorn Farm tell us how she like using it as a poultice. We get to see bees and ants racing for the nectar of the comfrey blossoms. She also feeds it to her animals. Toby Hemenway is the author of "Gaia's Garden A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture." He calls comfrey "the queen of the multi function plants." He talks a little about how easily it can spread when you don't want it. And then he talks about how he is able to get rid of it through mulching – but why would you not want it? It's a beneficial insect attractor; it is able to heal wounds; a dynamic nutrient accumulator; good for under fruit trees; good for a comfrey tree for soils; a huge biomass accumulator. Tulsey Latoski of Portland, Oregon tells us about how comfrey makes a great green manure and living mulch. Mostly due to the tap roots that will pull nutrients up from down deep. She also shows us two different types of comfrey. Norris Thomlinson of Portland, Oregon shares some observations about how comfrey fares as chicken feed; edible plant for humans; medicinal plant for humans; Michael Pilarski is a famous wildcrafter and permaculture consultant. www.friendsofthetrees.net He tells us about how comfrey sluff material off into the soil to make for a richer soil <b>…</b>
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sandhill cranes out my window – montana

www.permies.com For a few weeks sandhill cranes kept hanging out at my house. Super early in the morning they would sing just outside my open window. Too early, too close to my window, and too loud really. Ok! I'm awake already! The music is by my friend Jimmy Pardo. To hear more of his stuff and part with money for an album, follow this link www.permies.com www.permies.com www.permies.com
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