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Wood Chip Gardening: What I Wish I Knew When I First Started Back To Eden Gardening


Many people make mistakes with wood chip gardening and then run into problems. This video would have helped me so much when I started out with Back To Eden gardening. Here is the original Back to Eden video.

I had to watch lots of woodchip gardening videos to get all the details straight, so was glad to see this excellent summary.
YouTube
Back to Eden garden tour
Pre-composting wood chips
The best woodchips are ramial woodchips.

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HOMESTEADING Made Me RICH!


Homestead tour: While picking flowers for a bouquet I realize that I am rich! I talk about zinnias, beneficial flowers to attract pollinators to your garden as well as repel pests!

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Indoor Forest Gardens Using Low Energy Climate Battery Technology


Jerome Osentowski spoke at Bioneers in Boulder November 8, 2013 on Indoor Forest Gardens Using Low Energy Climate Battery Technology. He spoke about how to grow your own food year-round, even tropical fruits, using Climate Battery Technology – a greenhouse design with an emphasis on perennial polyculture and making the most of the space.

Learn more at Central Rocky Mountain Permaculture Institute
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Hoarder Downsizes to Gorgeous TINY HOUSE with her Cats


Jen used to be a hoarder and her “things” were controlling her life. Now she has downsized into a beautiful, clutter-free Tiny House with her two kitties. She eliminated several bills and now saves around $600/month.

YouTube

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Camp Woodstove Heater/Cooktop/Oven

Combined duty outdoor stove uses wood or pellets. One million views!

YouTube

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Fluid NYC flat uses sliding furniture to create 3 rooms in 1


Architect Peter Kostelov and his artist wife, Olga Feshina, wanted private rooms to work from home in their aging New York City apartment so they tore down the interior walls and rebuilt the 700-square-foot space with not just a living room, kitchen, bathroom and master bedroom, but two flex spaces which serve for work and guests (via slide-out beds).

With the help of Kostelov’s carpenter father Vladimir (who flew in from Russia to help) they used plywood to craft sliding tables, benches and beds, as well as cabinets, closets and some walls and ceiling finishes. “This is the biggest advantage of plywood: you can make shapes that are custom made… this is how you can save your budget and use as much space as you can.”

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Building The Ultimate Camper Van as a Tiny Home & Office on Wheels


We’ve been working pretty much 7 days a week on building our DIY camper van in a Ford Transit with a high roof. We’re planning a super functional home and office space in here, and are building it with as many natural materials as possible (cork, hemp, and FSC & formaldehyde-free plywood).

We’re going to have a semi-permanent bed with adjustable backrest and seating where we can work on our laptops. We’ll have a kitchen with running water, a small fridge, and a butane cooktop.

YouTube
The van build isn’t complete yet but stay tuned. This is one of my favorite channels and I’m sure the final result will be outstanding. With their vast experience, they will integrate all the best ideas. By the way, van living is the #1 favorite option of those living nomadic/on the road lifestyles so this topic will be of interest to many.

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Update on Confined Earthbag Building

Small earthbags are compacted with a plate compactor.

Small earthbags are compacted with a plate compactor.

I love hearing about innovative natural building projects. Ed, a long time reader, sent me an update on his earthbag home in Ecuador. Ed is using confined earthbags that sit within a reinforced concrete frame. This is a good method for those who need to meet building code and for areas that are vulnerable to hurricanes and earthquakes.

Compacted earthbags are set within a reinforced concrete frame with barbed wire between courses.

Compacted earthbags are set within a reinforced concrete frame with barbed wire between courses.

“We finally installed the last of the roughly 2,000 bags it took to build the house. Took a bunch of pics to show the process I finally ended up with. The bags we used were smaller than what you use, compacted they are 4x9x21 inches. [This works because the bags within a concrete frame.] They weigh about 45 pounds apiece. After plastering this still gives me a wall a little over 12 inches wide. I used cadenas through out (the rebar cage that’s $19.50 for one 6 meters long and made from 3/8ths rebar), no buttresses. All bags were filled and compacted in a form then installed compacted. The last batch of bags we did I decided to keep some good records. It took 3 of us 2 hours to run enough road base through a 3/8ths screen for 55 bags. It then took us 1 hour and 15 minutes to mix about 10% clay in a cement mixer and fill the 55 bags. It took us 40 minutes to compact the 55 bags using a plate compacter I bought. It took 35 minutes to install the 55 bags. [Total time: 2 + 1.25 + .45 + .5 = approx. 4.5 hours for 3 sq.m. wall area. Also note, try to buy good soil that doesn’t required extra ingredients and mixing.]

The bags are polypropylene or as they call it here, polypropelina and cost $190 for a thousand of them. The strength of this stuff never ceases to amaze me. On the front part of the house where I have one wall that is 11 feet tall I had to pour the concrete for the bond beam single handed. My problem was how to get the concrete up the ladder because there was no way I was going to carry all of those buckets up the ladder. I decided to try an experiment so I filled a bag with wet concrete to the brim and then just stuck the hook from my chain hoist straight through the weave of the bag with no reinforcement of any kind. I then hoisted the bag to the top of the wall and emptied it. After I had hoisted the bag to the top of the wall 25 times and emptied it there was no indication of impending failure but I got scared of it so I changed the bag. I used this technique for that whole wall and never had a bag fail. I figure I have about 25 cents worth of road base in each bag. The 10% clay is free. Barbed wire is about $20 for 200 meters. Sand and gravel are $22 a meter. A 50 kg. bag of Portland cement is $8.00. I would die a happy man if they started making 25 kg. bags of cement. I pay my workers $2 and hour which is actually about 50 cents an hour above the going rate and they work like freaking mules. Really good guys.

I didn’t take pictures of the concreting but you can see finished examples in the photos. Anyway we are now done with this part and I think the house could take a direct hit from a tractor trailer traveling 50 miles and hour and all it would do is piss the house off. Let me know if you have any questions. Thanks for all of your help and if and when we ever finish it I’ll send those photos.”
Cheers,
Ed

Related:
Confined Earthbag Construction
Confined Earthbag
Interesting idea: You could build a simple foot-levered device that raises the earthbags out of the form after they’re compacted. Also note how the end product is essentially rammed earth or large compressed earth blocks (CEBs). No need for a special CEB press using this method. Resell the plate compactor when your house is finished. Rammed earth requires expensive and time consuming formwork and expensive compaction equipment.

Update on Confined Earthbag Building is a post from: Natural Building Blog

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