Testing new Microgreens

Rather hot out to be growing the microgreens right now, but we received our new seed order and are anxious to taste the new varieties that we will grow this year. The real growing starts in mid-September and ends at middle of next July, but we need to give them a taste to see what mixes might work well, by seeing which ones have similair growing times and which flavours would work well together.

They don’t all go into mixes of course. Two of the favourites last year were Pea shoots and Sunnies (sunflowers), which will keep on going, along with a few others.

Here are the new varieties just starting out (only 4 days old).

Red Cabbage – These will give a pop of colour to your salad or sandwich! One of the most nutritious.
Wasabi Mustard – Hot, but a nice addition to sandwiches or salads.
Kaiware Radish – A beautiful fast-growing radish with a bright white stem and large leaves.
Bok Choy – a spicy tasting sprout from the cruciferous (cabbage) family.
Sandwich Booster is a sprout mix of clover, alfalfa, radish, and mustard.
Ruby Beets – Challenging to grow, but we’ll give it our best shot… Beautiful addition to salad.

Microgreens

wp-1476915124094.jpgWe’ve just recently started playing around with microgreens for our family. Taking two old window blind displays that are best kept out of landfill, I reconfigured them a bit to line up the horizontal supports to allow for continuous shelves across both units. The light fixture that was previously hanging vertically inside one of the units makes great lighting for the top shelf.

 

 

We also picked up a few grow-light units that were on clearance at a local indoor gardening shop for the middle. These use very little power, but as you can see below, the plants love them! We still have a couple of 3 foot fixtures sitting in shop that will work once we expand to using bottom section of displays. The plastic panels that used to sit in behind the display blinds were handy as shelf covers (makes easy cleaning) and light reflectors.

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1 week old Peas – Can’t wait to try these!

This little storage room in our shop is heated with a small oil-filled heater each year already, so there will be no additional cost to keep the plants happy. We keep the heat very low and will see how happy the micro greens are once winter really sets in. About a week before this post, we were down to -4 C overnight and it was still comfortable in room.

Total cost to get going was only about $80.00 + cost of seeds. We decided to buy larger quantities. The two below we bought 10 kgs. of each. A little costly up front, but will save a lot over winter and spring. From what I can read, micro greens have an average 4 – 5 times the nutrients as their mature counterparts. There was a study at the University of Maryland that tested the claims on nutrition and found some exciting results. Here is the short version from WebMD.

We bought our seeds in bulk from a Canadian seed supplier that sells only organic, non-GMO seeds. Here is part of our first indoor crop!

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The Sunflowers (Sunnies) are looking great as well. Diannes’ favorite! The black pieces are just the seed hulls that haven’t fallen off yet.

If anyone else is experimenting with microgreens, please let us know. We are thinking of starting a local ‘MicroGreens Club’ next year if all goes well, where we could have affordable monthly subscriptions. Let us know if there is anything along those lines in your area.